Sextortion Scam – DrHGuy’s Porno Exposed

I have long been shocked by – but perversely enough – impressed with elaborate internet scams – those that reach beyond the missives from Nigerian Princes and notifications of lottery winnings. Consider, for example,

Naturally, I was fascinated to be targeted in the somehow perfect for 2018 Sextortion Scam. Here’s the deal:

I (in the role of intended victim) received an email with a subject line that included my name and a password I had used a few years ago. The body of the email follows:

I’m aware XXXXXXXXXX is your password. You don’t know me and you’re probably thinking why you are getting this mail, right? Well, I actually placed a malware on the adult video clips (porno) web site and guess what, you visited this website to experience fun (you know what I mean)… just after that, my software program gathered every one of your contacts from your Messenger, Facebook, and email. If I do not receive $1,600 in Bitcoins, I will definately [sic] send out your video recording to all of your contacts including close relatives, co-workers, and many others. Nevertheless, if I receive the payment, I’ll destroy the video immidiately [sic]. If you need evidence, reply with ‘Yes!’ and I will send your video to your 10 friends. It is a non-negotiable offer, therefore do not waste my time and yours by responding to this message.

As it turns out, whoever sent this found a batch of real passwords stolen from a data breach. The scammers did not, however, access anyone’s webcam, porno site visits, invoices for those sex toys you bought for your anniversary celebration, phone sex recordings, etc. Nonetheless, they “have already made around $125,000 from the scheme to date [July 24, 2018], according to security researcher SecGuru, who is monitoring the bitcoin addresses used.1

So, if you receive a similar email, not to worry. It is, after all, a scam. It might be a good idea to update your passwords, especially if you are still using the one included in the message. But otherwise, you’re OK.

Now, I must admit that this email did prompt me to review my browser history. And, if the senders follow through on their threats to expose my most pornographic viewings, my contacts can expect to receive something like this:

 

 

Photo Credit: Adapted from U.S. Air Force photo/Airman Ty-Rico Lea

__________________________

  1. Scammers Are Pretending to Have Webcam Footage of Victims Watching Porn to Make Them Pay Up by Jason Murdock (Newsweek: July 24, 2018) []

Leave a Reply